Survival Situations

It’s important not to imagine our world to be more dangerous than it actually is. Concentrating on the negative side of anything is depressing and a waste of time, especially as even normally, we spend most of our time worrying about things that never happen.

So in becoming a survivor, we mustn’t lose sight of the joy and wonder of life, and the world we live in. In any case, we’re all survivors anyway; but a brushing up on the specifics never did anyone any harm.

Feeling Exposed

Our impression of danger is almost totally conditioned by media exaggeration. Newspapers don’t sell as many copies if they tell good news. A nice disaster is best for sales.

 

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2 Responses

  1. John Cutting says:

    Hi

    I also served in 3 Commando Brigade with 59 Independant Commando Squadron RE and also C Squadron 23 SAS.

    I used my knowledge and experience to form the Pilgrim Club. A community group of unpaid volunteers to help young people in our community have a better start in life. http://www.pilgrimclub.co.uk

    When it came to making a survival raft. I used the example in your book Outdoor Survival Guide, as a template. I initially made a small size model. From which I made some slight changes. Added a few health & saftey requirements and it worked. Pictures can be viewed on the above website albiet non rigged.

    I have permission to sail ths raft along the Thames from Teddington Lock to Chiswick Bridge.

    John

    • Hi John,
      Thanks for the message. Will be very interested to see how your raft sails. It’s likely it will have water coming over the logs – depending on what type of wood they are, and you’ll have to re-tighten the lashings when they get wet. With a sail, you need either a keel or large rudder – but I expect you realise that!
      You can adjust the buoyancy – as logs are nothing like as buoyant as for example empty jerry cans, by lashing them to the logs. This might sound stupid, as it doesn’t stop the water from coming over the logs, but if you try it the other way round – putting them underneath, with this type of raft it can easily flip over unless you use lots of empty jerry cans.
      All best, Hugh

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